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Rachael Thomas 'Bringing Your Settings To Life' #Giveaway

This week we have author Rachael Thomas with a writing craft post of 'Bringing Your Settings To Live' and there's a giveaway of a kindle copy of her latest release, From One Night To Wife to one commenter!



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Bringing Your Settings to Life


A well created setting will provide the perfect backdrop for your characters and whilst they will remain at the forefront of your story, a good setting can bring the scene to life.
If you write about London and Buckingham Palace, Paris and The Eiffel Tower or Venice and the canals, an image will be begin to form in your reader’s mind. So why not take it one step further? Use the senses to bring that setting to life and your story with it. With access to all sorts of information now on the internet, there is plenty of scope for exploring settings you’ve never been to but may have chosen for your story.
You don’t have to use famous landmarks to create your setting. The story could simply be taking place in a florist, a coffee shop or on a beach. What would it smell like, taste like, feel like, sound like as well as look like. Use all the senses to show your reader the setting and make it come alive.
An apparently quiet room can offer something to bring it to life, such as they tick of a clock, the hum of city traffic outside or the crackle of an open fire. Just a few elements can bring the setting alive, taking your reader there.
Make a list, using all the senses, of your chosen setting and incorporate them into your story. For instance, in my latest book, From One Night to Wife, Serena is waiting on the beach for Nikos. There’s the sound of the waves, the sand beneath her feet, the warmth of the wind and the salty tang in the air. You can also use settings which are emotionally powerful to your characters. For Serena, the beach triggers emotions and memories of the time she first met Nikos and is her chosen place to confront him again.
Even the most intense conversation between your characters needs a setting for your reader to imagine them in. You don’t have to create long pace slowing chunks of narrative to create your setting. Weave in things from your senses list, keeping your characters centre stage but bring your chosen setting to life.


One Night To Wife

A souvenir from her Greek affair! 

Three months ago, journalist Serena James had her heart broken by a man she'll never forget, especially not the fury in his eyes the night they parted. Now she's back in Santorini to tell him that their summer fling had unexpected repercussions…
Mogul Nikos Petrakis is on the verge of a deal that will make him even more powerful. He doesn't need any distraction—especially not a sexy redhead whose curves beg to be touched! But now that she's carrying his heir, Nikos is forced to make a decision.

It's time to make Serena his wife!

When one night…leads to pregnancy!

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26 comments:

  1. Sometimes the setting can become a character in itself. Think of Lord of the Rings or Cannery Row.

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  2. Setting is hugely important. Mishandled it is a big turn off too.
    Love that I am seeing From One Night... across the blogosphere.

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    1. Thanks Elephant's Child for stopping here too! I agree with what you say completely.

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  3. Great post! I love a good setting I can experience like I'm really there!

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    1. Me too Meradeth, I love to lose myself in far away places whilst reading.

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  4. It's great when the setting becomes as important to the story as the characters.

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  5. I like when the setting sets to mood too!

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    1. Setting are brilliant for conveying mood to the story! Thanks Southpay HR Sinclair

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  6. Appealing to the readers' senses can make a setting come alive, and if readers can imagine themselves within that setting, they're much more likely to become engrossed in the tale.

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  7. Sometime you just have to stop and listen to get a feel for surroundings and settings. Plus look, smell, touch, and taste.

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    1. Getting the feel of a setting is so important, but taking the time to stop, listen and feel is so true.

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  8. It's so important to incorporate all the senses in your writing!

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    1. That's what makes it come alive! Thanks for stopping by Sherry.

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  9. I agree, bringing the setting alive can make such a big difference for the reader. I enjoy rich settings combined with great characters and stories. Thanks for sharing, Rachael. Thanks, Kelly, for hosting!

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    1. Thanks for reading Karen! I love a setting which takes me there when I'm reading.

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  10. When I read I want to be there with the characters – a coffee shop, a beach I don’t mind just so long as I can ‘feel’ it.

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    1. I hope that I take my readers there to Barbara because like you, I want to be there with the characters when I read.

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  11. Agreed. The little details, finding exactly what to emphasize, that's what makes a setting breathe.

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    1. So very true Crystal! Thanks for stopping by.

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    1. Hi there again The Armchair Squid! Thanks for stopping by here too.

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  13. I love a beach setting. I find it evokes many emotions.

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    1. I love a beach setting too Medeia and I like to be on the beach. It's such a great place to switch off for a while.

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