Tackling Revisions by Karin Baine & Giveaway!

This week we have author Karin Baine talking about 'Tackling Revisions'. And she has a kindle copy of her new book, Midwife Under the Mistletoe to give away to one commenter! 



Karin Baine lives in Northern Ireland with her husband, two sons, and her out-of-control notebook collection. Her Mother and Grandmother's vast collection of books inspired her love of reading and her dream of becoming a Harlequin Mills & Boon® author. It wasn't until she joined her critical group UCW that she started to believe she could actually write – and only her husband's support enabled her to pursue it. At least now she can tell people she has a proper job! 


You can find Karin here:

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Tackling Revisions – Karin Baine

It doesn’t matter what stage your writing career is at, when you get that email attachment from an editor with suggested revisions your heart always skips a beat. Being faced with pages of changes to the story you’ve slaved over for weeks, or months, can be intimidating and often it’s difficult to know where to start. It wouldn’t be the first time I’ve opened an attachment and closed it again without even reading it because I’m scared to look!

I’m no expert but with ten medical romances published with Harlequin/Mills&Boon I’m going to share my process with you on tackling those dreaded revisions.

First, make sure you read the notes thoroughly and give yourself time to digest your editor’s comments. It can be just as tempting to jump straight in and get the changes back ASAP as it is to put them off but try to find a happy medium. Your editor doesn’t want to wait weeks for you to get back to them but equally, there’s no point rushing and not doing a thorough job.

After reading revisions through I immediately print them out and highlight all the key points. It’s easier to see them at a glance this way, especially if you have a notice board to pin them to. I also find it helpful to separate the comments into things my editor did, or didn’t, like. This means not only condensing the notes into easier to manage sections, but it also provides a list of positives to look back on when feeling discouraged!

It can take several read throughs of your manuscript to cover all the points raised and to make sure any changes haven’t affected your timeline but it’s important to check and save yourself another round of revisions. Of course, if there are certain things you disagree with you can raise these but the important thing to remember is that an editor wants to work with you to write the best possible book you can. 

All the hard work will be worth it in the end.




Midwife Under the Mistletoe



A kiss under the mistletoe…

A family for Christmas?

GP Fraser McColl longs to be part of a loving family, but past experience has taught him he’s better off alone. Only, thrown together with gorgeous yet guarded midwife Iona Munro, to care for two children at Christmas, he’s tempted to believe in miracles… After one passionate night together, can he persuade Iona that they deserve a lifetime of happiness—together?


Buy on:


Amazon UK               Amazon Aust

29 comments:

  1. As long as the revisions didn't change the storyline too much, I can see myself being okay with that. Knowing that it happens to all authors would make me feel better.

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    1. Our stories are our babies and most editors realise that :)

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  2. Suggestions for revisions are designed to help us - though I suspect that can be hard to remember.
    Love your suggestions.

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    1. It can be daunting when faced with dreaded revisions but they're always sent with the intent to improve our story.

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  3. Good advice, Karin. I'm in the midst of editing my latest story now and am reading the editors suggestions very carefully. Congratulations on your novel. It looks interesting.

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    1. Thanks. I've just received five pages of revisions so I'll have to take my own advice on board!

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  4. Hi Kelly - great to meet Baine - and good to see her husband is very supportive of her. I guess medical romances make sense - and if one has a knowledge of the subject matter that'd make life easier. It's being honest with oneself and realising that if your Editor wants to read it with some amendments - then others (your readers) will too ... but I can see your way of doing things ... slow but sure. Cheers to you both - Hilary

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  5. Revising is hard. And it always seems like they find the last thing you'd expect to change. Good advice.

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    1. It's good to get a new perspective on your characters and their journey.

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  6. I've got a huge soft spot for stories set against a medical background. This sounds like a reeeally good one. Good luck with it!

    But...UGH! It only takes you "weeks" or "months" to write your story? Compared to your productivity, my "speed" is glacial.

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    1. Thanks. Trust me, before deadlines came along I wrote at a snail's pace! :)

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  7. Digesting the editing comments....Great advice.
    Sounds like you've written another great read.

    Hello, Kelly:)

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  8. Thank you for sharing. Great advice. Happy Writing!

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  9. Great advice. I know after I open my edits I need to read through, close, and digest. I need to think for at least a day about what I have to do and then start getting edits done. :) Best of luck, Karin.
    ~Jess

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    1. I need a while for the shock to wear off too lol

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  10. Nobody like getting news that they have to revise yet again, but in the end, it's worth it.

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  11. I don't write books but I still enjoy the advice. I would need to do the same in printing and going over everything before getting into it but I'm impulsive so maybe not haha (:
    I didn't know medical romance was a subgenre. I love Christmas stories. Ones like Midwife Under the Mistletoe always remind me of Hallmark movies.

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  12. Thanks for sharing this post on revisions. So much to take in. And you make good points.

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  13. I so agree with her strategy for tackling edits. I always approach this task with dread, but once I'm into it, I find I can do so much more with the story and the characters. Thanks for hosting Karin here.

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  14. Thank you for the tips! Great advice! Also, the book sounds like a fun read!

    (I don't have a Kindle at the moment, so I can't enter the contest.)

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  15. It sounds like she has such a good way to handle tackling the revisions and breaking it into stages which makes it manageable. I really like what she said about separating them out as well, so you can have positive comments to look on during the self-doubt times. So necessary!

    My recent post: https://oliviascatastrophe.com/2018/12/resolutions-wrap-up-did-i-stick-to-my-resolutions/

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